The basics for (start-up) brand name owners: Understanding Intellectual Property aspects in Aruba and the Dutch Caribbean

So as an entrepreneur you developed a product or a service, you are ready to launch or have already launched and are now ready to spread your wings and market into places like Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, Bonaire, Saba and St Eustatius (or not), here a few things you ought to keep in mind:

1.    The islands of the Dutch Caribbean consist of 4 separate and distinct jurisdictions for trademark purposes.

2.    Having a trademark registered in one of the islands doesn’t give you protection in the other islands.

3.    Having a trademark registered in the Netherlands doesn’t (necessarily) give you protection in the other islands.

4.    The basis for trademark protection differs among the islands. Aruba is based on the “right of first use”. While in some of the other islands it is based on “first to file”.

5.    The cost/fee structure is variable from island-to-island. Some of the government fees were recently implemented while others are dated and are subject to change when the government feels the need to adapt the government fees.

6.    Exclusive agency or distribution agreement does not provide you with exclusive rights to sell a product i.e. parallel-import isn’t prohibited.

7.    Even if you don’t intend to sell or market your product in the islands, you are well served by having the right trademark a/o copyright protection in place. The presence of free (trade) zones in the islands and in the region along with the geographical location can make the islands vulnerable for transshipment of counterfeit products.

8.    Aruba is a great location to base your intellectual property portfolio and manage this throughout the Caribbean and Latin America.

9.    We offer a sound legal system, highly effective and experienced courts who understand the value of intellectual property matters.

10. My team is not only well-versed at handling trademark registration matters but have a track record on enforcement matters and litigation, with a number of landmark cases at the Supreme Court of The Hague.

11. Ooh.... and did I mention we speak all the (6) languages that are used in the region.

 

 

Lincoln D. Gomez

www.gobiklaw.com

 

 

Legal recourse for fashion brands against counterfeit products in Aruba

Aruba is located in the Caribbean and forms geographically part of the Lesser Antilles. It is located a mere 12 miles from the coast of Venezuela. The island has a free zone and s located close to other free zones located in Curacao, Venezuela and Panama. Aruba is known for its tourism. The combination of these factors makes Aruba vulnerable for the trade in counterfeit products.  Not so good news for brand owners. The good news for brand owners is that Aruba’s legislation contains effective remedies for the fight against counterfeit products. This includes the possibility to place an attachment on counterfeit products, no matter if these are located in retail stores, warehouses or in transshipment. This can be done in an extra-judicial hearing without need of having the counterfeiting merchant present or represented. 

Following such order a court appointed bailiff can go to the locations where the counterfeit products are found and seize these products. Subsequently an order can be obtained from the courts to destroy the counterfeit products as well as to obtain information about the supply chain and quantities ordered. This entire process can take place in a matter of weeks. The same effective remedies can be obtained in the other islands of the Dutch Caribbean. Over time many brand owners were able to successfully use these remedies to score a victory over the bad guys. Gomez & Bikker has been involved in a number of these actions and have the experience and know-how to successfully plan and execute such actions. We look forward to working with our colleagues from INTA and ASIPI in these matters. For more information contact us.

Sint Maarten launches Intellectual Property Registry

As of October 1st, 2015, the Bureau for Intellectual Property of Curaçao is no longer the competent authority for registering Sint Maarten trademarks and will not handle/process any requests received on or after that date. The Bureau for Intellectual Property of Sint Maarten (BIP SXM) in cooperation with the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP) will open for business on-line on Monday, October 5, 2015.

Venezuelan PTO increases rates and introduces direct payment

The Venezuelan PTO announced new increased rates for Intellectual Property related matters in Venezuela. Two interesting facts related to the increase are:1. in some instances a 60% increase in government fees; and 2. the requirement as of May 28th, 2015 is for the foreign applicants/owners to pay the fees directly to the PTO and not via the Venezuelan IP law firms. It remains unclear what the effects of this, if any, will be for the law firms in question. The industry has filed an appeal against these measures.

Registro de Marcas en Bahamas

La legislación en materia de propiedad intelectual de Bahamas, es decir, la Ordenanza de Marcas Cap 1906 CH. 322, se basa en el principio de “first-to-file” o prioridad de depósito. La oficina de propiedad intelectual se llama el Departamento General de Registro. El proceso dura aproximadamente 18 meses. El registro de la marca y sus posteriores renovaciones tendrán una vigencia de 14 años. Los registros de marca se publican cada mes en una Gaceta Oficial de Marcas de Bahamas. En las Bahamas no se aplica la classification de Nice. No hay provision para registro de marcas a base de registro en Inglaterra.

Registro de Marcas en Jamaica

La legislación en materia de propiedad intelectual de Suriname, es decir, la Ordenanza de Marcas del 1999, se basa en el principio de “first-to-file” o prioridad de depósito. La Ordenanza entre on el vigor en el 2001. El proceso dura aproximadamente 12 meses.  El registro de la marca y sus posteriores renovaciones tendrán una vigencia de 10 años. Los registros de marca se publican cada mes en una Gaceta Oficial de Jamaica.

Registro de Marcas en Suriname

La legislación en materia de propiedad intelectual de Suriname, es decir, la Ordenanza Royal  deReglas de  Marcas, se basa en el principio de “first-to-file” o prioridad de depósito. El proceso dura aproximadamente  12 meses. El poder para registrar una marca en Suriname tien que ser notarizado. El registro de la marca y sus posteriores renovaciones tendrán una vigencia de 10 años. Los registros de marca se publican cada mes en una Gaceta Oficial de Suriname.

Registro de marcas en Curaçao

http://lincolngomezip.com/?random

Debido a cambios constitucionales, las Antillas Holandesas dejaron de existir el 10 de octubre de 2010. Desde entonces la isla de Curaçao se ha convertido en un Estado dentro del Reino de los Países Bajos y Curaçao ha establecido su propia Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual (“OPI”). La legislación en materia de propiedad intelectual de Curaçao, es decir, la Ordenanza Nacional de Marcas de 1995, se basa en el principio de “first-to-file” o prioridad de depósito. En otras palabras, quien registre una marca en primer lugar adquiere el derech0 exclusivo a usar dicha marca en Curaçao. Aunque no se exige que una marca esté en uso en el momento del depósito o con anterioridad a éste, los registros pueden ser anulados por el Tribunal de Primera Instancia de Curaçao a petición de cualquier tercero, si se puede demostrar que no se ha hecho uso de la marca durante un período ininterrumpido de 5 años. El uso por parte del titular tras un período ininterrumpido de 5 años de uso sirve para cumplir (otra ves con) el requisito de “uso”. El registro de la marca y sus posteriores renovaciones tendrán una vigencia de 10 años. Los registros de marca se publican cada mes en una Gaceta Oficial (“Merkenblad”).

Registrar una marca en Bonaire (las Islas BES)

Debido a cambios constitucionales, las Antillas Holandesas dejaron de existir el 10 de octubre de 2010. Desde entonces Bonaire, Sint Eustatius y Saba (las “Islas BES”) se han convertido en municipios especiales de los Países Bajos. La Oficina de la Propiedad Intelectual del Benelux (“OPIB”) gestiona la Oficina de Marcas. El Arreglo de Madrid y su Protocolo son de aplicación en las Islas BES. La legislación en materia de propiedad intelectual de las Islas BES, es decir, la Ley de Marcas para las Islas BES, se basa en el principio de “first-to-file” o prioridad de depósito. En otras palabras, quien registre una marca en primer lugar adquiere el derecho exclusivo a usar dicha marca en las Islas BES. Aunque no se exige que una marca esté en uso en el momento del depósito o con anterioridad a éste, los registros pueden ser anulados por el Tribunal de Primera Instancia de las Islas BES a petición de cualquier tercero, si se puede demostrar que no se ha hecho uso de la marca durante un período ininterrumpido de 5 años. Su uso por parte del titular tras un período ininterrumpido de 5 años de uso servirá para cumplir el requisito de “uso”. El registro de la marca y sus posteriores renovaciones tendrán una vigencia de 10 años. Los registros de marca se publican cada mes en una Gaceta Oficial. El principio de “first-to-file” o prioridad de depósito se entiende sin perjuicio de los derechos de prioridad establecidos por el Convenio de París para la Protección de la Propiedad Industrial de 20 de marzo de 1883 y el Protocolo de 27 de junio de 1989 (Serie de Tratados [Trb.] 1990, 44) concerniente al Arreglo de Madrid relativo al Registro Internacional de Marcas de 14 de abril de 1891 o del derecho de prioridad con arreglo al Acuerdo sobre los Aspectos de los Derechos de Propiedad Intelectual relacionados con el Comercio, de 15 de abril de 1994, que es el Anexo 1C del Acuerdo por el que se establece la Organización Mundial del Comercio.

Registro de marcas en Sint Maarten

Debido a cambios constitucionales, las Antillas Holandesas dejaron de existir el 10 de octubre de 2010. Desde entonces la isla de Sint Maarten se ha convertido en un Estado dentro del Reino de los Países Bajos. Tras los cambios constitucionales Sint Maarten no ha establecido su propia Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual (“OPI”). Se decidió que la OPI de Curaçao gestionara los depósitos de marca para Sint Maarten durante un período transitorio. La legislación en materia de propiedad intelectual de Sint Maarten, es decir, la Ordenanza Nacional de Marcas de 1995, se basa en el principio de “first-to-file” o prioridad de depósito. En otras palabras, quien registre una marca en primer lugar adquiere el derecho exclusivo a usar dicha marca en Sint Maarten. Aunque no se exige que una marca esté en uso en el momento del depósito o con anterioridad a éste, los registros pueden ser anulados por el Tribunal de Primera Instancia de Sint Maarten a petición de cualquier tercero, si se puede demostrar que no se ha hecho uso de la marca durante un período ininterrumpido de 5 años. Su uso por parte del titular tras un período ininterrumpido de 5 años de uso servirá para cumplir el requisito de “uso”. El registro de la marca y sus posteriores renovaciones tendrán una vigencia de 10 años. Los registros de marca se publican cada mes en una Gaceta Oficial.

Renovación de marcas en Aruba

Las marcas registradas o renovadas en Aruba tienen una vigencia de 10 años. La renovación del depósito de una marca en Aruba puede hacerse con hasta 6 meses de antelación respecto de la fecha de vencimiento. Si la marca ha expirado, la Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual de Aruba le concede un período de gracia de 3 meses para renovar el registro mediante el pago de una tasa de demora. Su abogado de marcas local necesitará un poder firmado por el solicitante. Del mismo modo que sucede con el depósito inicial, dicho poder no requiere legalización ni elevación a escritura pública. Por lo general el proceso de renovación se puede completar en unas 8 semanas. No se exige prueba del uso de la marca en el momento de presentar la solicitud de renovación.

Procedimiento de registro de marcas en Aruba

La Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual no exige que se proporcione prueba del primer uso o intención de uso para registrar una marca. El procedimiento de registro es sencillo, eficiente y se puede completar en tres semanas aproximadamente. El abogado de marcas deposita la solicitud en nombre del titular de la marca. Debe tenerse en cuenta que todos los abogados de marcas deben estar habilitados por la Oficina. El abogado de marcas necesitará un poder otorgado por el titular de la marca. En la práctica la Oficina acepta copias de poderes firmados remitidas por PDF. Es importante a efectos de buenas prácticas que el abogado conserve un original debidamente firmado en sus archivos. No se exige que el poder esté legalizado o elevado a escritura pública. Cuando la solicitud se deposite en la Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual, ésta llevará a cabo una investigación independiente para averiguar si existen objeciones a dicha solicitud. Tras este proceso y si no existen objeciones por parte de la Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual, la marca quedará registrada y se emitirá el correspondiente certificado de registro. El registro tiene una vigencia de diez años. Todas las marcas registradas se publican en la publicación oficial de la Oficina, denominada “Markaruba”.

Registro de Marcas en Aruba

El mero depósito de una marca no otorga al solicitante de registro el derecho exclusivo de uso de dicha marca. Con arreglo a la Ordenanza, el depósito de la marca establece una presunción de primer uso por parte del solicitante del registro. Esta presunción hace recaer la carga de la prueba respecto del primer uso de la marca en quienes aleguen tener el derecho exclusivo al uso de dicha marca. La presunción de primer uso es uno de los motivos por los cuales es aconsejable que el propietario de una marca la registre en Aruba. Asimismo, una vez que una marca ha sido depositada la Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual no registrará otras marcas que sean idénticas a ésta o tan similares que puedan generar confusión en el público en cuanto al origen de los bienes o servicios en Aruba.

Primer Uso de una Marca en Aruba

La normativa actualmente vigente en Aruba otorga el derecho exclusivo al uso de una marca registrada a quien haya realizado el primer uso de ésta en Aruba para diferenciar sus bienes o servicios en una categoría concreta dentro de la clasificación internacional, y pueda aportar prueba de ello. El primer uso puede basarse en los siguientes elementos: importación, (re)venta, uso de los bienes en el mercado local. Asimismo y según la jurisprudencia, el primer uso también puede obtenerse al publicitar los bienes o servicios en medios locales o internacionales que se distribuyan en Aruba.

The judicial system of Aruba in trademark matters.

The Joint Court of Justice of Aruba, Curaçao, Sint Maarten and of Bonaire, Saint Eustatius and Saba is responsible for the administration of justice in first instance and in appeal on the islands. The Joint Court of Justice consists of a presiding judge, the other members, and their substitutes. The members of the Joint Court of Justice deal, in first instance and in appeal, with civil cases, criminal cases, cases of administrative law and trademark related cases. The Court in First Instance

A case that is dealt with in court for the first time generally falls under the jurisdiction of the Court in First Instance, which is an organizational part of the Court of Appeal. One judge generally deals with cases in first instance. The Court in First Instance of the Netherlands Antilles has its seat in Curaçao and has jurisdiction in all the islands. There are also sessions in all the islands. There is a Court in First Instance of Aruba that is also part of the Court of Appeal.

The Trademark Act provides for an opposition procedure via the Court in First Instance of Aruba via a dedicated extra judicial procedure. This recourse does not prevent a party to initiate a regular civil action based on tort.

Cases in Appeal

The Joint Court of Justice handles cases in appeal that were dealt with and decided on by the Courts in First Instance. A judge who handled a case in first instance will not participate when the case is dealt with in appeal. Three members of the Court deal with the cases in appeal. Those judges then make up the Joint Court of Justice of Aruba, Curaçao, Sint Maarten and of Bonaire, Saint Eustatius and Saba. So, this name denotes both the whole of the judicial system of Aruba, Curaçao, Sint Maarten and of Bonaire, Saint Eustatius and Saba (including the Courts in First Instance) as well as the higher court of appeal by itself (hereafter ‘the Court of Appeal’). There are some exceptional cases where the Court of Appeal also handles cases in first instance with more than one judge.

Cases in the Supreme Court

Most decisions of the court of appeal may be appealed "in cassatie" to the Supreme Court of the Netherlands in The Hague. Decisions of the Supreme Court are final and do not address the facts of the case, but only points of law: whether the decision was based on the right legal grounds and properly motivated. The legal basis for those appeals is the Regulation of 20 July 1961, Stb. 1961, 212, titled the "Cassatieregeling Nederlandse Antillen" ("Appeals Regulations of the Netherlands Antilles"), later renamed "Cassatieregeling Nederlandse Antillen en Aruba".

One distinction between the appeals procedure in the Netherlands and that of the Caribbean territories is that when a judgment of a Netherlands court is overturned by the Supreme Court, the case is generally remanded to a different court at the lower level for purposes of rendering a new decision. Because the Joint Court is the only court at its level, it will rehear its own cases after being overruled.

Validez de un registro marcaría en Aruba

Validez de un registro marcaría en Aruba. Un registro de una marca en Aruba es válido por diez (10) años. Un registro marcaría debe ser renovado: (i) seis (6) meses antes de la expiración del plazo de protección; o (ii) tres (3) meses después de la expiración. Después del paso de tres meses una nueva solicitud de registro tendrá que ser presentado ante la Oficina de Propiedad de Intelectual de Aruba.

Aruba Trademark Act and a mala fides trademark registration

Brazilian based Souza Cruz S.A. and Paraguayan based Tabacalera del Este S.A. were involved in a trademark dispute in Aruba over the cigarettes trademark PALERMO. Souza Cruz had registered the trademark in Aruba on December 1st of 1998. Tabacalea had used and registered the trademark since 1996 in Paraguay and other places. Tabacalera launched an opposition procedure based on the Aruba Trademark Act against the registration made by Souza. The claimwas based on a so-called “mala fides”-registration by Souza. Tabacalera also argued that Souza had no ”justifiable interest” to keep the registration. Tabacalera was successful in the Court of First Instance of Aruba and also won the appeal that was filed by Souza. In February 2006 the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Souza and overturned the decision of the Appellate Court. The Supreme Court ruled that the Aruba Trademark Act had limited grounds for a successful opposition and that neither the terms “mala fides” nor “lack of justifiable interest” were part of the limited grounds. The case was send back to the Appellate Court for re-evaluation following the limits set by the Supreme Court. Back at the Appellate Court the trial continued and ultimately ruled in favor of Tabacalera del Este re-establishing the initial rulings by the lower courts.

Arubags trademark or copyright?

Aruba in it. Arubags initiated a court action to prevent Koolman from selling bags containing the “Arubags” design. Arubags had registered the trademark in Aruba in June 2010. Koolman had been retailing the products since 2004 and based on that the court of first instance of Aruba ruled in favor of Koolman based on the right of first use.Arubags appealed and the appellate court ruled in favor of Arubags; however the appellate court based the decision on the copyrights of Arubags not based on trademark. Koolman perceived this decision to be a “surprise-ruling” since Arubags had not made any allegations about copyrights during the proceedings.

The Supreme Court in The Hague later ruled that the appellate court had gone beyond the scope of the dispute by making a ruling based on copyright, while Arubags had not made such claim in court. The Supreme Court quashed the ruling and ordered the case back to the appellate court for further evaluation based on trademark aspects. The appellate court will now have to re-visit the matter and determined which of the parties has the right of first use of the trademark Arubags in Aruba.

Gomez & Bikker acted as advisor of Koolman on Supreme Curt aspects.

Complete ruling: http://uitspraken.rechtspraak.nl/inziendocument?id=ECLI:NL:HR:2014:212